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How voters chose their candidates - KOAM TV 7

How voters chose their candidates

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At a primary election like today's you choose a ballot for a particular party which narrows a voters choices.  When it comes to picking that one candidate most of those we talked to say they try to know more than just a politicians name.

Campaigning for office can be costly and time consuming but voters tell us they try to stay informed.  Many of those casting ballots today say they try to read about the candidates in the newspaper or in campaign flyers.

 

Voters say those campaign signs dotting streets don't lock in their vote but are helpful with name recognition and knowing who's actually in the race.  While that's helpful, flyers with voting records or issues the candidates supports would be a better investment of those campaign funds some voters tell us.

Several voters we spoke with say the "Salt + Light" guide created by a church with information about all candidates was better for them than short commercials.

"It helps because it's background, what these individuals believe in, which is some of the things I did not know, so it was very very helpful," says Alan Fulton.

Other voters we questioned mentioned an election section printed by the newspaper as a helpful resource.

Few voters have told us they go to candidate meet and greets but those who do tell us it's critical.

"I want to know them, see their attitudes," says Brenda Davidson.

"I believe that if you don't meet them, you can't understand their body language," says her husband, John Davidson.  "You can read a lot from that.  It's very important to read exactly who you're going to vote for - know who you're going to vote for instead of going in and picking a name."

 

Some say they checked out candidates online but only a few say they actually listen to robo-calls from campaigns.  When it comes to television ads voters say they watch but don't like when they get so negative.

Many question whether they can trust the content of political ads because they don't know what's true.

"They're not as accurate as you'd like them to be, so mostly read the paper and also some endorsements from other people that I trust," says Missouri voter Larry Baker.

"I don't care for the negatives," says Missouri voter Terri Fulton.  "Sometimes I won't vote for them because they are negative in so many."

Some voters tell us political party is important if they support a particular party's platform, but many told us they want to know where the individual candidate stands on individual issues.

Some tell us they vote for candidates of both parties when possible.

 

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