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Nutrition & Diet Myths - KOAM TV 7

Nutrition & Diet Myths

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Monday on KOAM Morning News, as part of our new, continuing series "Morning Exam," Jordan Aubey talked to Ruth Thompson, a registered dietitian with Freeman Hospital, about nutrition and diet myths.


Myth:  Certain foods can burn fat and make you lose weight.

There is diet information prescribing cabbage soup, celery and grapefruit as fat-burning foods.  The facts are that there is no research to support any one type of food's ability to burn fat. Certain foods may speed up your metabolism for a short time, but do not cause weight loss.

"In other words, for a short time caffeine/coffee stimulates the metabolic rate of an individual and speeds up the way the body uses energy or calories. The recommended way to lose weight is to have a balanced diet reducing the number of calories and increasing physical activity to lose one or two pounds a week," said Dr. Lydia Kaume, a nutrition and health nutrition specialist with University of Missouri Extension.

Myth: A serving size on a Food Nutrition Facts Label means how much I should eat of that food (portion size). 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Nutrition Facts label appears on most packaged foods and informs us how many servings are in a box or can. The serving size varies from product to product and provides information on how many calories are in one serving size.

"A portion size is how much of that food we choose to eat at one time. In some cases, serving sizes and portion sizes match but at all times an individual determine their portion size," said Kaume.

Myth: Exercise and physical activity only counts if I can do it for extended periods of time of 30-45 minutes.

To achieve your 150 to 300 minutes of activity each week, you do not need to be active for a long time. Experts advise that 10 minutes or longer at a time is adequate for aerobic exercise and one can plan to work on three of these sessions per day for five days to achieve recommended physical activity. 

Myth: Dairy products have fattening effects and are unhealthy.

Dairy products are rich sources of calcium and vitamin D. Research shows most Americans do not consume enough calcium and vitamin D. Choosing fat-free or low fat dairy products, like  low-fat yogurt, cheese, and milk, offer the protein necessary for building muscles and other body processes  and calcium and vitamin D to strengthen bones.  Adults aged 19-50 need 1000mg of calcium per day and adults over 50 need 1200 mg of calcium per day.

Source: University of Missouri Extension

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